United Nations Charter – October 24 1945

In the Herbst Theater auditorium in San Francisco, delegates from 50 nations sign the United Nations Charter, establishing the world body as a means of saving “succeeding generations from the scourge of war.” The Charter was ratified on October 24, and the first U.N. General Assembly met in London on January 10, 1946.

Despite the failure of the League of Nations in arbitrating the conflicts that led up to World War II, the Allies as early as 1941 proposed establishing a new international body to maintain peace in the postwar world. The idea of the United Nations began to be articulated in August 1941, when U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill signed the Atlantic Charter, which proposed a set of principles for international collaboration in maintaining peace and security. Later that year, Roosevelt coined “United Nations” to describe the nations allied against the Axis powers–Germany, Italy, and Japan. The term was first officially used on January 1, 1942, when representatives of 26 Allied nations met in Washington, D.C., and signed the Declaration by the United Nations, which endorsed the Atlantic Charter and presented the united war aims of the Allies.

In October 1943, the major Allied powers–Great Britain, the United States, the USSR, and China–met in Moscow and issued the Moscow Declaration, which officially stated the need for an international organization to replace the League of Nations. That goal was reaffirmed at the Allied conference in Tehran in December 1943, and in August 1944 Great Britain, the United States, the USSR, and China met at the Dumbarton Oaks estate in Washington, D.C., to lay the groundwork for the United Nations. Over seven weeks, the delegates sketched out the form of the world body but often disagreed over issues of membership and voting. Compromise was reached by the “Big Three”–the United States, Britain, and the USSR–at the Yalta Conference in February 1945, and all countries that had adhered to the 1942 Declaration by the United Nations were invited to the United Nations founding conference.

On April 25, 1945, the United Nations Conference on International Organization convened in San Francisco with 50 nations represented. Three months later, during which time Germany had surrendered, the final Charter of the United Nations was unanimously adopted by the delegates. On June 26, it was signed. The Charter, which consisted of a preamble and 19 chapters divided into 111 articles, called for the U.N. to maintain international peace and security, promote social progress and better standards of life, strengthen international law, and promote the expansion of human rights. The principal organs of the U.N., as specified in the Charter, were the Secretariat, the General Assembly, the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council, the International Court of Justice, and the Trusteeship Council.

On October 24, 1945, the U.N. Charter came into force upon its ratification by the five permanent members of the Security Council and a majority of other signatories. The first U.N. General Assembly, with 51 nations represented, opened in London on January 10, 1946. On October 24, 1949, exactly four years after the United Nations Charter went into effect, the cornerstone was laid for the present United Nations headquarters, located in New York City. Since 1945, the Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded more than ten times to the United Nations and its organizations or to individual U.N. officials, most recently to both the organization as a whole and Secretary-General Kofi Annan in 2001.

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Universal Declaration of Human Rights : 30 Articles

What is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?
Eleanor Roosevelt and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Eleanor Roosevelt and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, November 1949 © Wikimedia Commons
The traumatic events of the Second World War brought home that human rights are not always universally respected. The extermination of almost 17 million people during the Holocaust, including 6 million Jews, horrified the entire world. After the war, governments worldwide made a concerted effort to foster international peace and prevent conflict. This resulted in the establishment of the United Nations in June 1945.

In 1948, representatives from the 50 member states of the United Nations came together under the guidance of Eleanor Roosevelt (First Lady of the United States 1933-1945) to devise a list of all the human rights that everybody across the world should enjoy.

On 10 December 1948, the General Assembly of the United Nations announced the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) – 30 rights and freedoms that belong to all of us. Seven decades on and the rights they included continue to form the basis for all international human rights law.

Eleanor Roosevelt was heavily involved in championing civil rights and social activism. She was appointed chair of the UN Commission on Human Rights which drafted the UDHR. On the tenth anniversary of the UDHR, Eleanor gave a speech at the United Nations called ‘Where Do Human Rights Begin?’. Part of her speech has become famous for capturing the reason why human rights are for every one of us, in all parts of our daily lives:

‘Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home – so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the world of the individual person; the neighbourhood he lives in; the school or college he attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world.’

Eleanor Roosevelt, 1958

The UDHR marked an important shift by daring to say that all human beings are free and equal, regardless of colour, creed or religion. For the first time, a global agreement put human beings, not power politics, at the heart of its agenda.

The 30 rights and freedoms set out in the UDHR include the right to asylum, the right to freedom from torture, the right to free speech and the right to education. It includes civil and political rights, like the right to life, liberty, free speech and privacy. It also includes economic, social and cultural rights, like the right to social security, health and education.

A summary of the 30 articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Article 1: We are all born free. We all have our own thoughts and ideas and we should all be treated the same way.

Article 2: The rights in the UDHR belong to everyone, no matter who we are, where we’re from, or whatever we believe.

Article 3: We all have the right to life, and to live in freedom and safety.

Article 4: No one should be held as a slave, and no one has the right to treat anyone else as their slave.

Article 5: No one has the right to inflict torture, or to subject anyone else to cruel or inhuman treatment.

Article 6: We should all have the same level of legal protection whoever we are, and wherever in the world we are.

Article 7: The law is the same for everyone, and must treat us all equally.

Article 8: We should all have the right to legal support if we are treated unfairly.

Article 9: Nobody should be arrested, put in prison, or sent away from our country unless there is good reason to do so.

Article 10: Everyone accused of a crime has the right to a fair and public trial, and those that try us should be independent and not influenced by others.

Article 11: Everyone accused of a crime has the right to be considered innocent until they have fairly been proven to be guilty.

Article 12: Nobody has the right to enter our home, open our mail, or intrude on our families without good reason. We also have the right to be protected if someone tries to unfairly damage our reputation.

Article 13: We all have the right to move freely within our country, and to visit and leave other countries when we wish.

Article 14: If we are at risk of harm we have the right to go to another country to seek protection.

Article 15: We all have the right to be a citizen of a country and nobody should prevent us, without good reason, from being a citizen of another country if we wish.

Article 16: We should have the right to marry and have a family as soon as we’re legally old enough. Our ethnicity, nationality and religion should not stop us from being able to do this. Men and women have the same rights when they are married and also when they’re separated. We should never be forced to marry. The government has a responsibility to protect us and our family.

Article 17: Everyone has the right to own property, and no one has the right to take this away from us without a fair reason.

Article 18: Everyone has the freedom to think or believe what they want, including the right to religious belief. We have the right to change our beliefs or religion at any time, and the right to publicly or privately practise our chosen religion, alone or with others.

Article 19: Everyone has the right to their own opinions, and to be able to express them freely. We should have the right to share our ideas with who we want, and in whichever way we choose.

Article 20: We should all have the right to form groups and organise peaceful meetings. Nobody should be forced to belong to a group if they don’t want to.

Article 21: We all have the right to take part in our country’s political affairs either by freely choosing politicians to represent us, or by belonging to the government ourselves. Governments should be voted for by the public on a regular basis, and every person’s individual vote should be secret. Every individual vote should be worth the same.

Article 22: The society we live in should help every person develop to their best ability through access to work, involvement in cultural activity, and the right to social welfare. Every person in society should have the freedom to develop their personality with the support of the resources available in that country.

Article 23: We all have the right to employment, to be free to choose our work, and to be paid a fair salary that allows us to live and support our family. Everyone who does the same work should have the right to equal pay, without discrimination. We have the right to come together and form trade union groups to defend our interests as workers.

Article 24: Everyone has the right to rest and leisure time. There should be limits on working hours, and people should be able to take holidays with pay.

Article 25: We all have the right to enough food, clothing, housing and healthcare for ourselves and our families. We should have access to support if we are out of work, ill, elderly, disabled, widowed, or can’t earn a living for reasons outside of our control. An expectant mother and her baby should both receive extra care and support. All children should have the same rights when they are born.

Article 26: Everyone has the right to education. Primary schooling should be free. We should all be able to continue our studies as far as we wish. At school we should be helped to develop our talents, and be taught an understanding and respect for everyone’s human rights. We should also be taught to get on with others whatever their ethnicity, religion, or country they come from. Our parents have the right to choose what kind of school we go to.

Article 27: We all have the right to get involved in our community’s arts, music, literature and sciences, and the benefits they bring. If we are an artist, a musician, a writer or a scientist, our works should be protected and we should be able to benefit from them.

Article 28: We all have the right to live in a peaceful and orderly society so that these rights and freedoms can be protected, and these rights can be enjoyed in all other countries around the world.

Article 29: We have duties to the community we live in that should allow us to develop as fully as possible. The law should guarantee human rights and should allow everyone to enjoy the same mutual respect.

Article 30: No government, group or individual should act in a way that would destroy the rights and freedoms of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

 

Source

Do you know your left from your right?

One learns how words are cunning little things which over the course of time,
decide that they want to mean something different from what they used to mean.
So roll back the mists of time to the early 1930’s.
Europe was a decade on from the end of WW1, and there was political turmoil in
Germany.
A huge struggle was taking place between the various groups that made up the
socialist political parties.

In the event,it came down to two main groupings, the Communists, who flourished
after the Russian revolution in 1918: these were the ones who followed a harsh form
of extreme socialism, which envisaged the whole world governed under one ruling body
(this persists today under the guise of the One World Order movement), and the other
group were equally socialist in outlook, but had a dominant sense of nationalism.

This group had the title of the National Socialist German Workers Party, which was
abbreviated to the form NAZI,for short.

Thus there were two main competing violent groups both promoting extreme policies:
consequently in order to make an easy distinction between the two, the Communists
were referred to as the Left wing of the socialist movement, whilst the NAZI Party
became identified as the Right wing.

Both totally Socialists in their politics separated only by their approach as either
an international or national movement.
BOTH ARE PROPONENTS OF FORMS OF FASCISM.

AS I said initially, words have a habit of turning up at a later date, pretending to
have a new meaning, such that Right Wing is now confused with meaning some form of
Conservatism: not so for the original use.

Finally, one has to approach words with a degree of scepticism. What a word means
to you may well have a different connotation to the next person,so you think you
are talking about the same thing, but each of you has a different understanding of
the word.

As Winston Churchill once commented, the United States and the United Kingdom were
two nations divided by a common language.

So keep a close eye on the little blighters you never know what they will morph
into next.

From Uncle David

Public Health Amendment (Safe Access to Reproductive Health Clinics) Bill 2018 NSW

Thank you to those who prayed and fasted and contacted members of the NSW Legislative Assembly earlier this month. Very sadly, after a marathon debate that lasted until the early hours of Friday 8 June, the Public Health Amendment (Safe Access to Reproductive Health Clinics) Bill 2018 passed easily with a final vote of 61 to 18.  As explained in this report compiled by the Australian Prayer Network, the imposition of 150-metre “safe access zones”around abortion clinics is a huge setback for the freedom of speech and the sanctity of human life in NSW.
Even though we did not receive the miracle that we had hoped for, we believe that our prayers and speaking out are never wasted. God does hear our prayers and He is faithful!  And so, let us persevere in prayer and keep trusting God for His results.

Al-Baghdadi Caliphate

Iraq Raqqa  the capital of the Caliphate

 

As war between the West and Islamic State escalates, little is known of IS leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi. Is destroying Al-Baghdadi the key to defeating terror? This report explores the ISIS reign of terror in Syria.

“Al-Baghdadi has only appeared in public once, and after that never again”, describes Hani. Like so many Syrians, Hani fled from the brutality of the Islamic State after they captured his hometown of Raqqa. It is not only in Raqqa that the lives of citizens are in danger. While Sinjar is one of the first major cities that ISIS has had to give up, after their retreat the horrendous consequences of their reign of terror became clear. Mass open graves filled with bodies revealed the remains of anyone who did not share their beliefs. Captured by US forces in Iraq in 2004 and detained at Camp Bucca, Baghdadi has gone on to build a powerful and remorseless caliphate intent on world Jihad. “Al-Baghdadi wants to be portrayed as the religious leader of this new nation. But he wants to be invisible. This only increases his appeal”, explains an expert. In response to their growing strength, Western powers have increased military retaliation in Syria, but this war cannot be fought with weapons alone; it is far more complex. As one expert describes, “you can’t bomb an ideology…if you try to bomb an ideology you will only reinforce it”.

ISIS leader al-Baghdadi and Saudi Crown Prince bin Nayef

 

 

 

 

 

 

Austria to shut down mosques, expel foreign-funded imams

June 8, 2018

VIENNA (Reuters) – Austria’s right-wing government plans to shut seven mosques and could expel dozens of imams in what it said was “just the beginning” of a push against radical Islam and foreign funding of religious groups that Turkey condemned as racist.

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz attends a news conference in Vienna, Austria June 8, 2018.

The coalition government, an alliance of conservatives and the far right, came to power soon after Europe’s migration crisis on promises to prevent another influx and restrict benefits for new immigrants and refugees.

The moves follow a “law on Islam”, passed in 2015, which banned foreign funding of religious groups and created a duty for Muslim organizations to have “a positive fundamental view towards (Austria’s) state and society”.

Both coalition parties have called for tougher immigration controls and a crackdown on radical Islam.

“Political Islam’s parallel societies and radicalizing tendencies have no place in our country,” said Chancellor Sebastian Kurz, who, in a previous job as minister in charge of integration, steered the Islam bill into law.

Standing next to him and two other cabinet members on Friday, far-right Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache told a news conference: “This is just the beginning.”

Austria, a country of 8.8 million people, has roughly 600,000 Muslim inhabitants, most of whom are Turkish or have families of Turkish origin.

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan’s spokesman said the new policy was part of an “Islamophobic, racist and discriminatory wave” in Austria.

“The Austrian government’s ideologically charged practices are in violation of universal legal principles, social integration policies, minority rights and the ethics of co-existence,” Ibrahim Kalin tweeted.

The ministers at the news conference said up to 60 imams belonging to the Turkish-Islamic Union for Cultural and Social Cooperation in Austria (ATIB), a Muslim group close to the Turkish government, could be expelled from the country or have visas denied on the grounds of receiving foreign funding.

A government handout put the number at 40, of whom 11 were under review and two had already received a negative ruling.

ATIB spokesman Yasar Ersoy acknowledged that its imams were paid by Diyanet, the Turkish state religious authority, but it was trying to change that.

“We are currently working on having imams be paid from funds within the country,” he told ORF radio.

One organization that runs a mosque in Vienna and is influenced by the “Grey Wolves”, a Turkish nationalist youth group, will be shut down for operating illegally, as will an Arab Muslim group that runs at least six mosques, the government said in a statement.

Reporting by Francois Murphy; Additional reporting by Ali Kucukgocmen in Istanbul; Editing by Robin Pomeroy

Source:


Erdogan warns Austria: ‘Imam crackdown will lead to holy war’

Erdogan warns Austria: ‘Imam crackdown will lead to holy war’

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Saturday strongly criticized Austria’s move to close mosques and expel Turkish-funded imams, slamming the decision as anti-Islamic and promising a response.

“These measures taken by the Austrian prime minister are, I fear, leading the world toward a war between the cross and the crescent,” Erdogan said in a speech in Istanbul.

The crescent is a symbol associated with Islam.

His comments came the day after the Austrian government announced it could expel up to 60 Turkish-funded imams and their families and would shut down seven mosques as part of a crackdown on “political Islam,” triggering fury in Ankara.

Interior Minister Herbert Kickl of the far-right Freedom Party (FPOe), the junior partner in Austria’s coalition government said the move concerned imams with alleged links to the Turkish-Islamic Cultural Associations (ATIB) organisation, a branch of Turkey’s religious affairs agency Diyanet.

Kickl added the government suspects them of contravening a ban on foreign funding of religious office holders.

A Turkish presidential spokesman had on Friday described the Austrian move as “a reflection of the anti-Islam, racist and discriminatory populist wave in this country”.

However, other European far-right leaders welcomed the announcement.

Even Austria’s opposition parties were broadly supportive of Friday’s announcement, with the centre-left Social Democrats calling it “the first sensible thing this government’s done.”

But the Green Party pointed out it could serve as a propaganda victory for the Turkish government.

Erdogan, speaking Saturday, said: “They say they’re going to kick our religious men out of Austria. Do you think we will not react if you do such a thing?”

“That means we’re going to have to do something,” he added without elaborating.

Around 360,000 people of Turkish origin live in Austria, including 117,000 Turkish nationals.

Relations between Ankara and Vienna have been strained since a failed coup against Erdogan in 2016 which was followed by a wave of arrests.

Erdogan’s speech comes in the run-up to presidential and legislative elections on June 24 in which he faces stiff opposition.

The Austrian government has banned Turkish officials from holding meetings in the country ahead of the polls.

Muslim refugees to the British people “we do not accept British laws, you adopt our Sharia Laws”

Is Europe in Denial About the Islamist Threat?

 

They come as refugees and then want to live under Sharia law.
According to sharia laws:
– There is no freedom of religion or freedom of speech.
– There is no equality between people (the non-Muslim is not equal to the Muslim).
– There are no equal rights for men and women.
– There is no democracy or a separation between religion and state politics.
Sharia is incompatible with Western values.
The Western world must close its borders, deport illegal immigrants, and ban the Sharia laws.

Liberals and leftists in the West use the made up term “Islamophobia” to portray anyone who criticizes Islam as a “racist”.
Radical Muslim terrorists all over the world carry out terror attacks “in the name of Allah”.
They justify their violence by quoting verses from the Quran.
Islamophobia is a made up word created by the Muslim Brotherhood specifically to silence debate.
Liberals and leftists ignore the fact that Islam is an ideology that has nothing to do with race.
Islamophobia is a neologism created to silence any possible debate about the problems Islamic extremism has got with modernity, with the intention of using the collective post-colonial “guilt” to exempt a particular set of beliefs from scrutiny, analysis and criticism.
It’s a buzzword used in an attempt to silence anyone, whenever had legit questions or criticisms about the religion.

Islam is not a race. It’s a religion. There is an attempt in the West to impose a sharia-blasphemy law to criminalize criticism of Islam.
It started when Saudi Arabia and Muslim countries tried to pass a UN resolution to force Western states to criminalize criticism of Islam.
The Parliament in Canada passed “Motion M-103” to condemn the so-called “Islamophobia (Fear of Islam)” in a preparation for a blasphemy law in Canada.
According to the sharia blasphemy law anyone who criticizes Islam or the Prophet Muhammad should be killed.
Under Sharia blasphemy law in Saudi Arabia and Iran Muslims are executed if they are accused of blasphemy.
In Pakistan, the situation is even worse, radical Muslims use the blasphemy law to persecute the Christian minority.
Is this the law the liberals in the West want to adopt?

“The Safest Port Is Yours”: Italy’s Interior Minister Blocks Migrant Ship, Hundreds Of North Africans Denied Entry

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Italy’s new populist Interior Minister, Matteo Salvini, has made good on his warning last weekend that “the good times for illegals are over” – writing an urgent letter ordering Malta to accept a ship carrying 629 shipwrecked North African migrants currently sitting off the Italian coast – calling Malta the “safest port” for the passengers, and advising that Rome will not offer refuge.

Demanding Sharia in Denmark

 

 

 

 

‘Shariah zone’ threats make life miserable for Denmark bar owners

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/may/13/shariah-zone-threats-make-life-miserable-for-denma/

– The Washington Times – Friday, May 13, 2016

Bar owners in Denmark claim Muslim citizens are trying to force them out of business by establishing “Shariah zones” in their neighborhood.

Police and local officials in the Norrebro suburb of Copenhagen have been repeatedly contacted about extortion, vandalism and threats to paying customers.

“Recently some young men came into the bar and shouted that all guests should leave,” Heidi Dyrnesli of Cafe Heimdal told a local television station, The Local Denmarkreported Thursday. “They shouted that the site belongs to them and that Norrebro is a Sharia zone, so there is no drinking alcohol.”

Birgitte Fischer, the owner of Mucki Bar, also testified to threats of violence. She said “Shariah zone” enforcers demanded $9,200 for “protection money.”

Danish Minister for Integration Inger Stojberg visited the businesses Wednesday to speak with the owners and was called a “Nazi” and a “fascist” by two local women, the website reported. The women were detained by police.

“There is a group of young people here who do not behave properly, and we have powerless tavern owners. If you are resourceful, I think you should help with that and can help solve the problem so people in Norrebro can live a normal life,” Ms. Stojberg told Denmark’s BT tabloid, the International Business Times reported Thursday.